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Marsala

Marsala is internationally famous for one thing: wine. Its inhabitants, however, while being extremely proud of their amber nectar, are equally enthusiastic about their town’s long, illustrious history. The present-day name, deriving from the Arabic “Marsa Allah”, meaning “Port of God”, gives us an idea of just how strategically important the town once was.


Though its streets are paved in gleaming marble, lined with stately baroque buildings and peppered with graceful piazzas, Marsala has pleasures that are simple – a friendly passeggiata (evening stroll) most nights, plenty of aperitif options and family-friendly restaurants aplenty.


Top Attractions


Museo Archeologico Baglio Anselmi

Marsala's finest treasure is the partially reconstructed remains of a Carthaginian liburna (warship) sunk off the Egadi Islands during the First Punic War.


Piazza della Repubblica

Marsala's most elegant piazza is dominated by the imposing Chiesa Madre. Just across the way, on the eastern side of the square, is the arcaded Palazzo VII Aprile.


Chiesa del Purgatorio

This beautiful 18th-century church (1771), with showy, heavily sculpted facade, is a fine example of Sicilian baroque architecture.


Porta Garibaldi

This old town gate marks the southern edge of Marsala's historic centre.

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